Laminated Coffee Cup Stand

~CS_OnlineOpenerMore than 30 years ago, when I was in the business of building kitchen cabinets, I made my first “coffee cup table” as a gift for my father. It consisted of a cherry column with a round disc of Corian on the top. It gave my father a place to put his coffee cup as he enjoyed a morning crossword puzzle in his favorite chair. I have changed the design over the years, trying a Stickley-inspired Arts & Crafts design as well as the free-form design shown here. This one is a stack-lamination pedestal about 24” tall.

Anyone can make this small, satisfying project in a weekend, using scrap wood or cutoffs of any thickness. You need small pieces at least 8”-10” long, plus this equipment: a band saw, a few clamps, a nail gun (or 3d nails and a hammer), a random-orbit sander and a 4-1/2” angle grinder with a carving disc. I use a coarse Kutzall dish wheel (#77J62.20 at Lee Valley).

This pedestal table is very handy for holding various drinks, and the aesthetic, organic shape appeals to nearly everyone. You can use the piece as a plant stand, or enlarge it to make an end table. You could even use the columns as legs on a larger table for a true statement piece. The possibilities are endless. It’s simple, fun and easy to learn. And it’s a sustainable way to re-purpose or up-cycle scraps.

To continue reading this article, you must purchase a 360 Fanatic Membership or a 360 Enthusiast Membership.

Posted on

2 thoughts on “Laminated Coffee Cup Stand

  1. Dale, I notice that you used the same species of wood for the project, is there any probation on using different wood?
    Charles

  2. I haven’t used different woods but I don’t know of any problem other than taking the stain differently. You could even paint if you wanted an even look. You could use different woods and finish it natural and show off the contrast. That is what is so great about this project, you can do about anything you can think of, there isn’t any “wrong”… And if something ends up bad, it only cost you some time and scrap wood. You could even use some plywood, MDF, hardwood and softwood and, what the heck, add some particleboard too! I should try that!

    It’s all good,

    Dale

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *