Goodbye to Finish Build-Up

When using my revolving finishing jig I apply finish as the turntable rotates. My projects move by finish spewing from my spray gun. That results in finish build-up.

It’s not noticed at the time, but finish build-up begins to layer on the turntable with each project. After 25 years of finishing an estimated 30 to 50 pieces per year (at least in my earlier days of woodworking), it’s necessary to replace the turntable. (Guess I was overdue for a change.)

Once during the years in service, I dropped the jig onto the floor and a chunk of the finish build-up popped off. You could see individual layers. It resembled, in miniature, the walls of a canyon.

Build-up Bonanza

What started off as 3/4″ plywood was now about 1″ in thickness with all the layers of shellac and lacquer that had been applied inadvertently as my projects were coated. I’m sure there are a few layers of aniline dye, too.

One corner resembled crumpled sheet metal found on a junkyard car. Another was as smooth as a small body of water being passed over by the eye of a hurricane. And the base wasn’t in much better shape; some areas looked like a kindergartner’s attempt at paper mache.

The surprise was that the lazy Susan used on the old jig was still spinning. The metal was not rusted beyond use. That could have been because the hole in the tray, which allowed the screws to be inserted into the base, was completely covered over. That build-up had to have taken a couple of years to happen, and that kept solvents and products from reaching the core.

Using a finishing shop-made jig for 25 years is Okay in my book. I grabbed a couple newer pieces of plywood and assembled revolving finish support 2.0. It may outlast me!

— Glen D. Huey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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One thought on “Goodbye to Finish Build-Up

  1. I made one of those and it works great.
    I have to admit though, yours has seniority over mine.
    Here’s to 2.0 and you rocking another 25 years in the shop!
    Thanks Glen.

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