The Free Issue #8 Weekend Has Begun!

In case you haven’t been paying attention, Glen and I have set up a special edition of Issue #8 that everyone can explore. You don’t need to be a member or register or anything. In fact, you don’t even have to log in. All it takes is clicking on the link at the top of our home page and you’re off and running.

And if you’ve been on the fence about joining 360 WoodWorking, this is a great weekend to fully explore an entire issue. When you’ve worked your way through as much of it as you can, and you’re ready to join, use the discount code 10off at checkout to save $10 on a Fanatic Membership. And, while you’re perusing the site, check out all the Hands-On Classes we hold in our shop in West Chester, Ohio (just north of Cincinnati). There’s even a discount code if you want to sign up for one of those (save50), but you’ll save even more if you become a Fanatic first.

The first article in Issue #8 of 360 WoodWorking is by David Heim, noted woodworking author and editor, on how to make identical turnings. If you like to make furniture, this is an essential read because it’s hard to break the square box look if you can’t turn. And few pieces of furniture have only one turned leg, so learning how to make your turnings look the same from spindle to spindle is a necessary skill. Below is an excerpt. Click the link to read the whole article – Free!

Click here to continue exploring Issue #8

Identical_Spindle_Turnings_Opener

A majority of woodworkers who own a lathe use it to make legs, round stretchers, spindles, and other furniture components. Those parts share one important trait – the orientation of the wood on the lathe. The wood blanks are held between the lathe centers by their ends so that the grain runs parallel to the lathe bed. This is known as spindle turning.

Spindle turning is pretty easy, because you work along the wood’s long-grain. The way you move a gouge or skew chisel to shape coves and beads helps ensure that cut fibers always support the tool. You seldom have to deal with torn end grain.

(read more…)

 

Enjoy.

— Chuck Bender

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